The Photo Vault: Bogotá Street Art

 

Street art in Bogota, Colombia

Bogotá, Colombia, September 2011

Having just come back from a quick trip to Bogotá where there was no time to sight-see in amongst the errands we had to run, a striking piece of street art took me back to the 4 weeks I spent in Bogotá in 2011 before travelling to Santa Marta and meeting mi novio.

One of the things the most notable things in Bogotá is the street art. I saw it everywhere as I wandered the streets of La Candelaria and I wanted to find out more. The street art in Bogotá is particularly striking because it is more design and imagery and less simple tagging. To me this is art.

I stumbled across a flyer on the pinboard at my Spanish school for a graffiti tour and managed to talk two classmates, including a girl who has also produced her own street art in Switzerland, into going on the tour with me.

We met with Christian, an Australian expat and the man behind Bogota Graffiti Tours, at the Parque de los Periodistas for the tour and learned that they were in their first few weeks of operating the tours. Christian took us around La Candelaria and then further afield to see major street art pieces by well-known local and international artists and explained the many techniques and signature styles of the work. It was fascinating.

Seeing walls like the one in this photo make me happy. It feeds my soul. All of Bogotá is a gallery and these pieces have their place in time. From the moment they are completed the murals begin to change and evolve with weather and other factors. But this also is accessible art where you can get up close to, touch and photograph the pieces without a security guard telling you off.

For me, the street art in Bogotá was the first sign of a cultural smorgasbord waiting to be discovered in the city. I can´t wait to keep discovering more.

The Photo Vault is where I will be sharing my favourite photos (and their stories) that deserve better than being lost in the depths of my iPhoto never to be shared.

The Photo Vault: Statue of Christ

 

A striking crucifixion of Jesus statue in Encarnacion, Paraguay
A striking crucifixion of Jesus statue in Encarnacion, Paraguay

Encarnacion, Paraguay, 2004

I was in Encarnacion to visit the Jesuit ruins and took this photo in the early evening while wandering around the city after having just arrived. I never made it to the ruins (instead I visited those in Posadas, Argentina) as it rained all day and ended up indulging in a trashy day watching MTV and jumping around on my double bed in a private room to the music. The small joys of budget travellers. However the image of this statue has stuck with me all these years and is on my list of favourite statues for its construction and materials. I love the pose and the skyward look. The hands are so interesting and kind of alien, taking in far less detail than the face and crown of thorns. He also doesn’t have feet and instead the gown ends in a Casper the Friendly Ghost esque tail, signifying Jesus’ transition I suppose. I guess one of more obvious parts is that Jesus isn’t on a cross, and that’s what makes this statue interesting and unique.

If you celebrate Easter, whether for religious or chocolate reasons, I wish you a wonderful weekend.

The Photo Vault is where I will be sharing striking photos (and their stories) that deserve better than being lost in the depths of my iPhoto never to be shared.

Yeah, I piked on the sunset

I spent the day at Arches National Park near Moab, Utah hiking with Brian who I’d met at the campsite.

Brian is one of those people whose passion is hiking and who is also very enthusiastic about photography. He is so keen he got up at 4:45am to capture the sunrise at Mesa Arch in Canyonlands National Park before breakfast.

Whilst we started our day at Arches fairly late with our first hike at 11:30am, I just couldn’t make the sunset at Delicate Arch that Brian was so keen to capture. I know that I need to take the time descriptions on the trail information with a big flake of Murray River Pink Salt, but I wasn’t keen to come back down the moderate-strenuous trail in the dark when I’d already walked about 15km.

So I elected to stay in the car for the 2 and half hours it took for Brian to get there, watch the sun set and get back. Sounds kind of boring, but it gave me time to plan the next few stops on my road trip, and you know, the sun sets every day.